Pitching in a Pinch!

Just to show how in the life of someone doing research and writing there is often so much luck involved–

I went on Thursday morning, in pure elation after receiving the perfect Preface from Erwin Chemerinsky for my first American History volume, to Barnes & Noble, my first jaunt to a Phoenix branch. I knew I needed to pick up Roger Kahn’s classic, The Boys of Summer, but always love to scan around anyways.

Well as a reflection of the superior literacy of Phoenix as against Los Angeles, the selection was broader. And in the baseball section after I found Kahn my eyes caught hold of a Penguin Classics version of Christy Mathewson’s Pitching in a Pinch. I knew all about Mathewson–except that he had written a book.

Naturally I felt compelled to buy it. After all I am citing Ted Williams, and a book citing both Williams AND Mathewson would be as dominant as a team featuring both, even without the other seven guys. So I picked it up and snapped through it, and finished it this afternoon. Immediately afterwards I began to rip through Kahn.

Well, well, wouldn’t you know it–Kahn EXPLICITLY credits Mathewson’s book as one of his major influences! And of course I would have missed plenty in Kahn’s book had I not by chance stumbled across this book, after refusing to buy Kahn when in LA and waiting the extra three weeks until I had relocated.

Reminds me of the time I was reading through a bunch of Great Books, very early in my reading program, and was snapping through the treatises of Locke. Decided to take a break and break out the Bible, which I had not read in full, and read the first few books of it. I finished Samuel I and stopped, returning immediately to Locke and starting his Second Treatise on Civil Government, and BANG! Locke cites Samuel I a bunch of times.

Amazing how it all turns out. Luck or predestination? You be the judge.

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